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Idiolexicon Poetry Series
Rancho Parnassus, 132 6th St, San Francisco
7 PM
Free
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Thursday, September 23, 2010
Kaya Oakes
Lee Ann Roripaugh
Cynthia Weyuker


Kaya Oakes

Kaya Oakes’ nonfiction book, Slanted and Enchanted: The Evolution of Indie Culture, was published by Henry Holt in 2009 and was selected as a San Francisco Chronicle notable book. She’s also the author of a collection of poetry, Telegraph, which received the Transcontinental Poetry Prize from Pavement Saw Press. In 2002, Kaya co-founded Kitchen Sink Magazine, which received the Utne Independent Press Award for Best New Magazine in 2003. Since 1999, she’s taught writing at the University of California, Berkeley. She earned an MFA in creative writing at Saint Mary’s College. Kaya has been the recipient of teaching fellowships from the Mellon Faculty Institute and the Bay Area Writing Project, as well as writing awards from the Academy of American Poets. She’s also twice been nominated for the Pushcart Prize in nonfiction.


Lee Ann Roripaugh

Lee Ann Roripaugh’s third volume of poetry, On the Cusp of a Dangerous Year, was published by Southern Illinois University Press in 2009. A second volume of poetry, Year of the Snake, also published by Southern Illinois University Press, was named winner of the Association of Asian American Studies Book Award in Poetry/Prose for 2004. Her first book, Beyond Heart Mountain (Penguin Books, 1999), was a 1998 winner of the National Poetry Series, and was selected as a finalist for the 2000 Asian American Literary Awards. Roripaugh is a Professor of English at the University of South Dakota.


Cynthia Weyuker


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Cynthia Weyuker uses Musical Saw, Voice, and loop box as a performance medium. She’s a three-time “Most Unusual Performance” winner at the International Musical Saw Festival. Recent adventures include Larry Beau at the Dublin Fringe Festival, The Ladies Punk Rock Sextet, SF Theater Festival, SF Fringe Festival, Relay for Life, and Folkspeare: The Bard in a Nutshell.

Breathe




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